The Demand of Separate Statehood

tipra1 Image source: thenortheasttoday.com

As cited by administrators, creating a separate state is an enunciation to a better judiciary and administration.

Although creating a separate country is based on different science altogether. Considering a recent example of Scottish referendum, the Scots being a separate country but falling in the jurisdiction of UK voted NO because many were afraid of how an independent Scotland might change their day-to-day lives. While the ‘Yes’ camp’s case for independence attracted millions of voters, the task of building a workable, independent nation proved too daunting for many.

In India we have too many examples were the separatisms has prevailed due to various reasons. Lets us not drag J & Kashmir in this issue as it has a different history all together.

(AFSPA) in 1958 to put down separatist movements in certain parts of the country when insurgency occurred in North East India in Manipur, Nagaland, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Tripura. The more important issue with these states however is territorial dispute with neighbours such as Pakistan and the PRC, rather than independence from the India.

The law was first enforced in Manipur and then also in other insurgency-ridden north-east. It was extended to most parts of Indian-administered Kashmir soon after the outbreak of armed insurgency in 1989.
The soldiers are immune to law against prosecution unless the Indian government gives prior sanction for such prosecution. The government demands that the AFSPA is necessary to restore normalcy in regions like Kashmir and Manipur. The situations in these have always been highly sensitive, we have also noticed oppressions from the people, especially the brave Iron Lady of Manipur, Irom Sharmila and then the inhumane case of Thangjam Manorama which lead to a huge and nationwide fruitless protest.

Nagalim(Nagaland)
Tripura
Khalistan(Sikh Country)
Bodoland (Assam)

Are a few examples were insurgency for a separate country arose in the past. Also Dravida Nadu (Dravidian speaking) people rose to create a separate country for the speakers of Dravidian Language with the support of the local political party DMK.

It would be wrong to assure that such insurgency may not occur in the future because India is a politically driven country, with countless languages and incredible diversity. Language, religion, caste are a few reasons that initiate such extremism.

We must look into North East, even today we experience cases of these people coming to other states for for education and jobs and being killed due to language barriers and non identical reasons (Bangalore,Delhi)

It is somewhere our fault that leads to such incidents. Weather or not it is bound to happens again in our country, we must realise the fact the diversity is a boon and a curse to the nation. Defending this country we must strive hard to respect each other and if we can, we must go out of our way to offset this common sense of inequality because the only way we can succeed in becoming a first world nation is by understanding the strength of this diversified nation and promoting the idea of egalitarianism.

What did Nelson Mandela change?

History_Speeches_4033_Nelson_Mandela_Support_Abolish_Aparteid_still_624x352Image Source : history.com

Before we get to know about Nelson Mandela, here are 5 do you know about him.

  1. Mandela’s real name was Rolihlahla, which means troublemaker in his Xhosa tribe.
  2. He acted in Spike Lee’s 1992 biopic Malcolm X. In the movie Nelson acted as a teacher at the end of the movie and recited a famous speech by Malcolm. Mandela had refused to speak ‘by any means necessary’ in the same speech, for which the director put a scene of Malcolm X himself saying these words.
  3. Nelson Mandela married Graca Machel, whose first marriage was with Mozambique President Samora Machel. After his death, Graca married Nelson and thus become first lady of two nations.
  4. Mandela loved boxing but not for its violence, but for its techniques used for protecting oneself.
  5. He opened South Africa’s first black law firm in Johannesburg in 1952.

Nelson Mandela dedicated his life for the freedom of South Africa and for social change. Mandela was born in 1918 in South Africa which was at that time under British. Mandela was born in the racial segregated system of South Africa called apartheid which meant ‘apartness’.

Resistance Movement

He joined the national movement for freedom at an early age. In 1950’s he became a leader in the resistance movement. Resistance movement was a movement that fought for advocating equal rights to people of all color under the law.

Nation of equal opportunities

“I have fought against white domination and I have fought against black domination.”

Nelson championed equal rights for all people under democratic law. He wanted all people to have equal opportunities.

“It is an ideal for which I have prepared to die.”

Mandela in Prison

Mandela was put in prison in 1962 by the apartheid government. They had charged him with treason because they were threatened by the leadership that Mandela projected for it challenged their authority in the country.

Mandela spent 27 years in prison as prisoner 466/64. In jail, Mandela had a reputation and even after being isolated, that reputation grew over time and so did Mandela’s determination to end apartheid.

Mandela refused to accept release until he was allowed to fight for freedom of his countrymen.

At last in 1990, the South African government, due to international pressure released Mandela from prison nearly after three decades.

After release Mandela pledged to continue his fight to end apartheid even thought his health had deteriorated significantly after working in prison.

He led negotiations between white and black South Africans. Only after four years of struggle, South Africa held its first multi-racial elections in April 1994.

Nelson Mandela became the president of South Africa in 1994.

Time for the healing of the wounds has come.’

‘We pledge ourselves to liberate all our people.’

Can India be Income Tax free?

There is a national debate on abolishment of income tax in India, but is that possible and if it’s possible, is the government willing to do so?

If income tax was removed, there wouldn’t be a question of paying income tax or running away from it, thus legitimizing the money. Thus, no black money remains in the market apart from that of crime.

Since only 4% of Indian population pays income tax, the impact will be limited to the amount of 3 lakh cores that is generated though income tax.

This will also increase hugely, the amount deposited in banks because people will be freely willing to declare their income through their bank accounts and increase savings. This is not possible, it income tax is levied for people evade the tax and thus black money is generated.

Since the bank deposits will shoot up, the interest rates will also decline on loans.

Congress  leader  Sandeep Diksht said that the fear that lurks due to tax terrorism  and income tax officers going everywhere conducting searches is a problem for the people. Income tax officers are not known to be kind and honest in their activities and most of the times people are acquitted after contracts between the culprits and income tax authorities evading justice.

Income tax accounts for about 3 percent of the total GDP income of the country. There has been a failure from the govt to keep a check on the income tax evaded by the people. This has been a great backlog of the Indian economy where black income plays a major role and has its own economic system.

Monaco, Bermuda, Bahamas, Andora and UAE are some countries who have abolished income tax.

Congress leader Salman Soz said to News X that this idea is totally immature since income taxes are considered as progressive taxes. If a person earns more then he must pay higher tax. If it’s gone, then a poor man and a rich man will be paying the same amount of indirect tax which is unfair.

How industrial revolution changed the world

Industrial revolution saw the epitome of human intelligence, as a result innovations of industrial revolution paved the way for modern human lifestyle.

Until seventeenth century, most labour occupations were limited to work on fields. Labourers worked on lands of the aristocrats (the ones who owned land) and that was their only livelihood. Although the lives of aristocrats were elegant and full of leisure, servants were always at their disposal, be it for raising their children or taking their dogs for a walk. The lives of both were interdependent and the system had been there long enough to forget for those in service to not know when it all started.

The innovations that followed, mostly in United States and Britain significantly altered this system and put in place a new system that was momentous and game changing.

Inventors built machines for different kinds of work, like ones powered by water, steam and coal. The most important ones being steam engine, electricity, telephone, telegraph and so on.

  1. James Watt did not invent the Steam Engine

The first patent done against a steam engine was by Jerónimo de Ayanz y Beaumont in 1606. Beaumont was a Spanish inventor.

It was more than 150 years later, that James Watt invented a steam engine that could rotate continuously. This was a historic development in the invention since the invention and thus invention of steam engine is highly attributed to James Watt rather than Beaumont.

  1. Traveling show had encouraged the idea of anesthesia

Horace wells while watching a traveling show saw an acquaintance get injured while being high on laughing gas (nitrous oxide). He asked the man later if he did not feel the pain. To his surprise, the man said no. He tested the gas on himself and asked the organizer of the show, Gardner Colton to remove his molar. After experimenting it successfully on himself, he then tried it on his patients.

  1. It took eight hours to get the first photograph

A French inventor, Nicephore Niepce, in the 1820s, created the first photograph by exposing light sensitive chemicals coated on a paper. He exposed the paper to the image projected by the camera obscura and we got one of the first images ever recorded. Though there were many, but eventually got destroyed and thus, Le Gras by Nicephore remains the oldest surviving photograph.

Cashless Economy: What about these 600 million people

 

600 million Indians don’t have bank accounts in India.

Even before demonetisation, Prime Minister Narendra Modi has laid emphasis on a digital Indian economy. This idea of digital economy has become even more obvious with shifting focus from the problems faced by the poor due to cash crunch to the future that can be through digital economy.

History of cashless economy

The first country to push cashless economy is Denmark along Norway and Sweden. Among others, Australia, UK, South Korea is also pushing for cashless society.

What’s wrong with cashless society?

Today, we live in a world that is highly unequal, especially when it comes to distribution of wealth. A cashless society will further jeopardize this situation for the poor and uneducated who have no access to such knowledge.

In such a scenario, the govt. openly shouting for a cashless society and PM Modi asking party workers to promote this idea seems unrealistic and ill fated when we know that the poor are going to be left behind.

Not only that, BJP has euphemistically ignored the impact of demonetisation on the poor. The deaths that have been caused, the decreasing payment of daily wage labors and loss of livelihoods for many farmers among others has been ignored completely by the ruling political parties.

How can the government that claims to be ‘pro-poor’ talk about a cashless economy when they know that only the literates, affluent and technically learned people will be the true beneficiaries of this idea. While the poor, illiterate, child labours, women labours, daily wage labours and many more will be excluded from its success.

Developed Scandinavian countries, Australia and UK among others can afford such a plan for their small number of population as compare to India and almost 100% literacy. But laying too much emphasis on this plan in India and at the same time failing to educate and improve literacy will definitely push further the increasing gap between the rich and the poor.

Such a plan is not pro poor, but pro rich and middle class, attractive to the bourgeois and mostly effective and feasible in cities. There are only 800 per million card swiping machines in the country. What’s even sadder is the ignorance of media to educate and debate the impact of this intention. The government is hiding behind big bang schemes to hide its malfunctioning and we people are foolishly standing and enjoying as the world changes in front of our eyes and the poor are thrown aside like a garbage bag.